My mulberry trees in front of my house.
Close up....the mulberry fruits are ripening. Notice the healthy leaves which I'm going to pluck to make into nutritious tea.
The leaves that have been harvested. I only harvest mature and clean leaves free from diseases. These leaves are washed under running water. Make sure that there is no impurities on the leaves.
The leaves that have been washed are now ready to be sun dried. I normally dry these leaves for  two to three days depending on the sunshine! During cold weather it may take longer time to have them really dried.
On the third day, the leaves looks like this! It had been raining on and off during the time I sun dried these leaves. Drying time is around 10.00 o'clock and collecting time around 3.00 or 4.00 o'clock in the afternoon.  If the leaves are still not dried enough, I will have to do the drying again the following day until they're completely dried up. 
You will know that the leaves are ready to be used when you crush the leaves with your hand and they could easily be crushed into powder. But do not crush them into powder. Just have them lightly and loosely crushed.
This is how my mulberry tea leaves look like. If you want them darker, you can sun dry them longer under the sun. 

A glass of fresh mulberry tea ready to be consumed! 
To know more about the health benefits of this sweet tasting tea, please click here: - Mulberry Tea | Mulberrytea.org:

71 Comments

Sarah said…
Thanks for sharing.
Anonymous said…
I love my mulberry tree and look forward to the berries each year but I didn't know about the leaves - thank you!
Anonymous said…
Great!! Ill make the tea soon!! Gracias my fb group: all about fruit trees
Selena Marie said…
I didn't know mulberry leaves were edible! Can you eat them or only make tea from them?

Can I share this link on my blog?

savingwithselena.blogspot.com
Anonymous said…
We are planning to make business regarding mulberry leaves tea and mulberry fruit jam. Do you think sun drying is enough to prolong the life span of the tea?
Anne L* said…
Hi Selena Marie!
Thanks for dropping in.
You cannot take raw mulberry leaves as it contains harmful chemical when raw.
Yes, you're most welcome to share this on your blog. :D
Anne L* said…
Dear Anonymous,
mulberry leaves that have been sun dried will not turn bad as long as they're stored in a container free from moisture and kept in dry area.
I am eager to make mulberry tea too. I live in the tropics and have just planted my tree from a grafting.
Anonymous said…
Hi, how do I make Mulberry twig tea? I have a lot of branches left from pruning.
I have read that it is good for your joints.

Can I just cut the twigs in slices, dry them and make tea out of them?

Thanks a lot!
Anne L* said…
I'm not sure about Mulberry twig tea. But I've seen twigs of other plants that are processed the same way as the leaves. The only thing is that like you said the twigs are chopped/sliced and dried for a few days. Unlike leaves, usually the stems, stalks, and twigs of tea plant are bitter. So, please take precaution. You need to do more research on this. :-)
Unknown said…
does the leaves have to be off a female plant?
Anonymous said…
Can i juice young mulberry leaves and drink the raw juice like wheat grass juice
Anne L* said…
Hi Mark Finch,
I believe all the mulberry plants in my front yard are of female species as they bear fruits. :-)
Anyway, I've no idea whether tea leaves must be of male or female plants. I guess it does not matter...
Anne L* said…
Dear anonymous,
As far as I know raw and young mulberry leaves are not edible. They contains tannin, saponin and other toxic chemical that may be hazardous to human consumption.
MBrooks said…
What's the best way to have the leaves cleaned and process before making it a tea. Also, how long does it usually take for the harmful chemicals like tannin and others to remove out of the leaf before making into a tea?
Anne L* said…
Dear MBrooks,
To answer your question, please refer my post above.:-) Do not be too worry about the chemical contents from mulberry leaves. As long as the leaves are mature and have been dried under a hot sun until they're crisp, they are fine for making a great tasting tea. :-)
Anonymous said…
Thank you for info on Mulberry Tea making. A friend told me to just steep the clean healthy leaves in boiled water...but after reading above, it sounds like you are concerned about some chemicals...I do need something strong to help my eye problems...in addition to relying on pharmacy eye drops to control pressure...so am wondering if this is something my nice big trees are here to help me with.
Unknown said…
Thanks for all the data sharing on mulberries! Question for you- When you say mature leaves: do you mean maturity as in age of the tree or time of the year? I am curious if you have to wait for the tree to be fruit producing age to reach the leaf maturity you speak of or if you mean the time of the year such as summer months verses early spring. Thanks!
Anne L* said…
No, what I mean by mature leaves are that the leaves are greener & thicker in texture. It doesn't matter whether the tree is old or whether it's the right time of the year. Fyi, my mulberry trees are of the bush type. I prune them every now and then to encourage the growth of branches. More branches mean more leaves will shoot out. After the pruning process, it will take several weeks for new leaves to grow. When this happens you will see young mulberry leaves. They're light green and tender to the touch. These are not suitable for making tea. You need to wait for it to mature into darker green, thicker and tough. :-)
Anonymous said…
I live in Korea and whenever I see a Mullberry tree, I simply want to defoliate it for the tea !!! I do not wait day for the leaves to dry. I pluck good leaves, wash 'em at home, and drop 5 leaves hand ripped into quarters into a boiling quart or so of water. I turn down heat and let it do its thing for several minutes. The result is a fresh green tea greeenr than green tea with a GREAT fresh flavor. ALSO, another thing to do in hot summer is to make a weaker version of the same tea, let it cool, then overnight, let sit in fridge. You now have an AWSOME anti-oxidant drink that will hydrate and heal you. Win-win !!!
Anonymous said…
Can you dry the leaves in a dehydrator or does it have to be in the sun
Anne L* said…
This is just great!! Thanks for sharing new ways to enjoy mulberry tea.
********************
I have not tried using the dehydrator to dry the leaves. But I think with all the ideas shared here on how to enjoy our mulberry teas, I guess there is no harm trying it on the dehydrator...
Anonymous said…
Mona said,
thank you for this add, I just hear abour it and I tried already the green mulberry leaves. I am fewatful to know that I have to dry them because I have a history of low Blood sugar. GB
srsoli
Anne L* said…
Hi Mona,
Since you have a history of low blood sugar, please be extra cautious when taking mulberry tea as it may decrease your blood sugar. If you experience dizziness and blurred vision while taking the tea,stop consuming it and check with your doctor.
Anyway, you can still enjoy your mulberry through their fruits as they make good mulberry jam!!
Anonymous said…
I've tried cooking the young mulberry leaves as vegetable. not too bad. it tastes like spinach.
Anne L* said…
Yes...young mulberry leaves can be eaten only when cooked but they are quite chewy and can be tough :D
Anonymous said…
I just got my first mulberry tree!!!! And I'm very excited to start making my teas!!!! So the question is. Do I really need to sun dry the leaves for 3 days before making my tea???
Anne L* said…
Hi dear...my recommendation is to sun dry the leaves for a couple of days. Anyway, I've tried making my tea without having to sun dry the leaves and it tasted equally good.
Lucy F. said…
Hi! I have enjoyed reading each of the comments regarding the making of Mulberry Tea. Does it matter which variety is used? We have a 20 ft. plus tree which is now bearing fruits varying from light pink to black when very ripe.
We have juiced berries and LOVE the juice. I want to make jelly as well and maybe some jam.
I am diabetic and very interested in the benefits this tree may hold for me and my family. Thank you so much for sharing this! Mississippi, U.S.A.
Anne L* said…
Hi Lucy,
The benefits of mulberry tea has only been recently discovered. More studies need to be done as there are various species available and we can't tell which variety gives the best benefits. It is not advisable to take it to manage your diabetic condition. You may take it to enjoy the taste and the aroma. However it would be a great bonus if by consuming it, you find yourself more relaxed, better sleep and who knows lower blood sugar. :D
madamchocolat said…
Very pleased to find this article. I had some tea from a lovely artisan tea company in London, but they are not here anymore. I also have a mulberry tree in the garden, and had wondered if I could make my own tea from the leaves. Delighted to hear that I can and will be pruning the tree shortly. When I made the tea before I just used the leaves exactly as normal tea leaves, I didn't use prolonged boiling and the result is a lovely green grassy flavour, similar to the best Japanese green teas without any bitterness or tannins. AND if it helps lower blood sugar I will be drinking it every day from now on!
Anonymous said…
Thanks for sharing! Now we can still enjoy the produce from our mulberry tree after all the fruits have been eaten (by birds!).
Marla said…
Hi Anne, Thank you so much for the patience in answering all the questions. It helped a lot.
The one thing that was mentioned a few times but it is not clear is:
1. Is there a worry that the tea made with fresh leaves without drying has chemicals like tanin?
2. The tea with dry leaves has the same healthy benefits as if you make it with fresh green mature leaves?
Much appreciated!
Anonymous said…
I had a huge harvest last year(10kg+).I am looking forward for this yr harvest even more.coming soon,it is spring in Australia.I extract juice to drink.
Anonymous said…
Hello, A friend recommended Mulberry tea for weight loss and diabetes control. He lost 35 lbs in over 2 months and has better control of his diabetes by drinking a cup of tea in the morning. However, he suggested leaves from the fruitless mulberry tree which I assume is the male. But after reading this seems the female tree with fruit is what is being used.

In arrid states like New Mexico where I live it is illegal to plant mulberry trees and they are banned because their roots are notorious for causing foundation problems. Seems they need to be watered very deeply or else the roots come to the surface in search for water and if they find it under your house they can cause the foundation to lift or if they get near your water or sewer pipes they do damage too. Unlike some species of trees mullbery roots grow very thick like huge branches which is why they can cause so much damage. So water them deeply so encourage the roots to go down.

I am glad to know that my tree is far enough away from my house and can be used for health needs and not only for the great shade these trees provide. Going to dry some leaves and try the tea - thanks! Dorothy
Anonymous said…
Hi i read a blog about mulberry also that says young leaves of mulberry can be added to salad.. and fresh leaves can be boiled as tea.. im sorry but it just gives me confusion.. ��
Unknown said…
I've just found your page while researching mulberries. I just picked over a gallon and am loving it. This tree was planted in 1943 and it's loaded. I had no idea about the leaves. Now I know even more! Very grateful. Thank You. Now I get to enjoy the aroma and taste of mulberry tea and... Oh how wonderful it would be to see if the resveratrol remains after the sun drying and is still active.

Did you know that the character for mulberry in both Chinese and Japanese is the same? It is. It takes 10 strokes of the pen to make it.

Chinese - 桑 Sāng

Japanese - Kuwa

ENJOY THE DAY~
Anonymous said…
Can tea be made from ANY Mulberry tree?
Jack H said…
I've read on another site that the leaves should not be used for tea, until after the tree has produced it's fruit. Is this true?
Erika Rey said…
Hi Anne,

Thank you for the info. I have a 4 year old tree, lots of leaves and its about 8 feet talk, but not ones in the past four years has it gave us any fruit. Is that normal?

E.
PowSharon said…
It's good to know my mulberry tree is good for more than giving the birds purple crap to drop on my car! As a diabetic prone to high blood sugar levels, I'm certainly looking forward to making (and trying) some mulberry tea. I really appreciate your sharing this information! Thanks so much!!
spiceman said…
Copied & pasted from http://www.doctoroz.com/article/white-mulberry-checklist-try-latest-superfood

The white mulberry leaves have scientists especially excited, since they may help prevent diabetes.
A compound called 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) found in mulberry leaves is thought to inhibit sugar digestion so that most sugar is not absorbed into the bloodstream and is instead excreted.
Studies suggest DNJ helps prevent spikes in blood sugar. You can drink mulberry leaf tea with your meals to help control blood sugar and possibly prevent diabetes.
KC said…
Hi, I just came across your blog. Thank you very much for sharing. I have a small mulberry plant which I intend to nurture so that I can harvest the leaves. I notice that the plant is fruiting. They are still green. Are the ripened fruits edible?
ags said…
can they be preserved in some kind of brine for whatever reason?
Unknown said…
Thanks for sharing,God bless you
Mulberry leaf tea is suitable for young and old because it offers several vitamins that are useful for health. For patients who suffered from diabetes or high blood pressure, mulberry leaf tea can help decreasing sugar levels and blood pressure.
Anonymous said…
Thanks for telling me
Unknown said…
Hi Annie,
May I know if you live in HK?
Would you mind selling some mulberry leaves to me?
Unknown said…
Hi Annie,

I wonder if you previous message to you has been sent out successfully or not.
105ians said…
Can I just boil the leaves and drink without drying them? What if the leaves have some holes on them? Is it OK to boil and drink?
Unknown said…
Thanks so much for this post. I have a mulberry tree knocking on the door to my deck. This fall the leaves are drying on the deck and look exactly like your picture, though less organized, of course:). My family suffers from blood sugar sensitivities and mulberry leaf tea is the perfect tonic. Have you ever thought about marketing it locally?

Imani
Unknown said…
Thanks so much for this post! I have a mulberry tree knocking at the door to my deck. The fallen leaves look exactly like your picture, though less organized, of course. My family suffers from blood sugar sensitivities so I'm hoping at least one member can benefit from the tea. Have you considered marketing it locally?
Anonymous said…
There is a good chance that the mulberry tea is enhancing the work of insulin and that is why blood sugar is lowered. I have low blood sugar problems brought on by improper insulin function. I am going to try the tea to see if it helps my low blood sugar.
Anonymous said…
I am wrong about how the mulberry leaf tea works to drop blood sugar. I does it by causing malabsorption of carbohydrates. This link is to a sientific test:
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/84/3/551.full
Anonymous said…
Hi..may i ask if it is ok to drink everyday..
Anonymous said…
Has anyone used the microwave to dry mullbery leaves?
George Tom said…
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Karen Mkrtchyan said…
Hello
My name is Karen Mkrtchyan, I’m the owner of the blog https://armenianorganicsweets.blogspot.com
If I please you can we exchange links of our blogs by adding in the links’ section.
In advance thanks
All the best
Karen
Unknown said…
I've never created or commented on a blog before, but I was inspired by the effort that went into the creation of this site...so here is my first posting: Excellent work! Thanks for sharing.Dentist in Baltimore 
baxterdesign said…
If you look at the ingredients in health supplements, they only use the white mulberry.
Dwight said…
Sun dried vs air dried:
Just wondering, wouldn't sun drying volatilize some beneficial nutrients/elements of mulberry leaves? How about air drying any good?
Thanks
Anonymous said…
Thank you Ms. Anne L and all who posted comments and shared best practices about the mulberry leaves. This blog has been very helpful. Let's all enjoy this God given natural wonder
I've read research that says the white mulberry extract is best for brain detox. How much dried leaf do you use to make a cup of the tea?
Tenshi said…
Hi, I live in Texas and actually use young leaves in salads, since i have 3-4 trees. Im going to try tea, soon and was thinking of putting some mulberries in it, too. Have you tried it that way?
Jane said…
There is actually an article that contradicts this and indicates you can use raw leaves and it is very health beneficial. I would continue to research this idea.
Unknown said…
Hi. I have a black mulberry tree.. It is well over 28 ft tall... Is the black mulberry leaf OK for tea mate??? Can u peg them on a washing line for a few days to dry ya reckon? Regards steve
Unknown said…
Hi. I have a black mulberry tree.. It is well over 28 ft tall... Is the black mulberry leaf OK for tea mate??? Can u peg them on a washing line for a few days to dry ya reckon? Regards steve
Unknown said…
I love mulberry plant l plant this at my backyard /kidalapong malita dvo.occ.
Anonymous said…
Hi, can you make fresh-picked mulberry leaves and boiled it for tea instead of sundry?
Unknown said…
Thank for sharing